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HIGHLY QUALIFIED TEACHERS - Regulations

6. Establish requirements for special education teachers teaching multiple subjects.

Subject to 34 CFR 300.18(e) [see “Provides for separate HOUSSE standards for special education teachers” in this document], when used with respect to a special education teacher who teaches two or more core academic subjects exclusively to children with disabilities, highly qualified means that the teacher may either:
  • Meet the applicable requirements of section 9101 of the ESEA and 34 CFR 200.56(b) or (c);
  • In the case of a teacher who is not new to the profession, demonstrate competence in all the core academic subjects in which the teacher teaches in the same manner as is required for an elementary, middle, or secondary school teacher who is not new to the profession under 34 CFR 200.56(c) which may include a single HOUSSE covering multiple subjects; or
  • In the case of a new special education teacher who teaches multiple subjects, and who is highly qualified in mathematics, language arts, or science, demonstrate, not later than two years after the date of employment, competence in the other core academic subjects in which the teacher teaches in the same manner as is required for an elementary, middle, or secondary school teacher under 34 CFR 200.56(c), which may include a single HOUSSE covering multiple subjects.

[34 CFR 300.18(d)] [20 U.S.C. 1401(10)(D)]


4 HOUSSE stands for “high objective uniform state standard of evaluation.”
U.S. Department of Education -- Office of Special Education Programs -- Highly Qualified Teachers -- 10.04.06


Dialogue Starter - Cross-stakeholder


Reaction Questions


  1. The NCLB emphasis on subject area competence has implication for veteran special education teachers that have been teaching multiple core subjects to students with disabilities in special education settings. These teachers could pursue subject area certification through a state developed process known as HOUSSE (High Objective Uniform State Standard of Evaluation) for every subject that they would continue to teach.

    • In your view, why do special education teachers who teach core content need subject area certification?
    • What’s the value to the students in the classroom?


  2. In your view, can one teacher effectively teach multiple subjects to students with disabilities?


  3. In your experience, how will this provision impact service delivery in secondary special education programs?


Application Questions


  1. Do you know the HOUSSE provisions in your state? How can you find out?


  2. Based on your understanding of this provision, what service delivery issues will need to be addressed in secondary settings?


  3. Teachers that are new to the field are not eligible for HOUSSE options.

    • What will this provision mean for new teachers that are entering the field with a special education license?
    • What will it mean for teachers currently in preparation programs?


  4. What does the emphasis on subject area competence mean for teacher preparation programs in special education?


    These questions were developed by the following

    stakeholders working together:

     

    Role: Teacher
    Location: Pennsylvania

    Role: Family
    Location: Georgia

    Role: Teacher
    Location: Florida

    Role: Service Provider
    Location: Kentucky

    Role: Administrator
    Location: Illinois

    Role: Technical Assistance Provider
    Location: California

    Role: Administrator
    Location: Wyoming

    Role: State Education Agency
    Location: Arkansas

    Role: Higher Education
    Location: Florida

    Role: Higher Education
    Location: Pennsylvania