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NATIONAL INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS ACCESSIBILITY STANDARD (NIMAS) - Regulations

6. Establish responsibilities of LEAs for purchase of instructional materials.

Not later than December 3, 2006, an LEA that chooses to coordinate with the NIMAC, when purchasing print instructional materials, must acquire those instructional materials in the same manner, and subject to the same conditions as an SEA under 34 CFR 300.172.

Nothing in this section shall be construed to require an LEA to coordinate with the NIMAC. If an LEA chooses not to coordinate with the NIMAC, the LEA must provide an assurance to the SEA that the LEA will provide instructional materials to blind persons or other persons with print disabilities in a timely manner.

Nothing in this section relieves an LEA of its responsibility to ensure that children with disabilities who need instructional materials in accessible formats but are not included under the definition of blind or other persons with print disabilities in 34 CFR 300.172(e)(1)(i) or who need materials that cannot be produced from NIMAS files, receive those instructional materials in a timely manner.
[34 CFR 300.210] [20 U.S.C. 1413(a)(6)(E)]


Appendix C to Part 300--National Instructional Materials Accessibility Standard (NIMAS)

Under sections 612(a)(23)(A) and 674(e)(4) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, as amended by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004, the Secretary of Education establishes the NIMAS. Under section 674(e)(4) of the Act, the NIMAS applies to print instructional materials published after July 19, 2006. The purpose of the NIMAS is to help increase the availability and timely delivery of print instructional materials in accessible formats to blind or other persons with print disabilities in elementary and secondary schools.

See specifications for the standard at: http://nimas.cast.org/about/proposal/spec-v1_1.html

Dialogue Starter - Cross-stakeholder

Reaction Questions

  1. How does your district currently obtain materials for the blind and other persons with print disabilities?
    • What formats are typically obtained?
    • How might this provision expand the range of formats that your district typically obtains?


  2. What might happen at the local level if the state coordinates with NIMAC? What might happen at the local level if the state does not coordinate with NIMAC?


  3. What might happen if the state coordinates with NIMAC and the local level does not coordinate with the state/NIMAC? Why would an LEA choose to, or choose not to, coordinate with the state and NIMAC?


  4. If you are currently making accessible materials at the local level, how might this change the way that schools and teachers obtain materials for students with needs? If so, how?


  5. From your perspective, how might textbook adoption cycles at the state and/or local level impact access?


Application Questions

  1. How can specialized instructional materials be available in each classroom where a student attends?


  2. What local procedures can be put into place that will ensure access to supplementary print materials, whether developed by educators or purchased?


  3. What impact may NIMAS have on the IEP team in the LEA?

    These questions were developed by the following stakeholders working together:

    Role: Teacher
    Location: California

    Role: Related Service Provider
    Location: Connecticut

    Role: Educational Consultant
    Location: Florida

    Role: Related Service Provider
    Location: Florida

    Role: Special Education Administrator
    Location: Florida

    Role: General Education Administrator
    Location: Illinois

    Role: Teacher
    Location: Minnesota

    Role: Family Member
    Location: West Virginia

    Role: TA Provider
    Location: Massachusetts