Topical Guides

Secondary transition is simple in concept: prepare youth for life after high school.  In reality, secondary transition is complex and challenging to execute with multiple agencies and organizations, family members, and communities involved.  The Topics database section on Secondary Transition provides the techinical details of this IDEA 2004 requirement.

The following dialogue starters were written by members of the National Community of Practice on Secondary Transition in May 2009.  This section contains material and source topic briefs to help you talk with others about secondary transition.

Source document:

It’s More Than Just the Law: People Make It Happen
This document was produced by the Transition Coalition at the University of Kansas, Department of Special Education. The document was updated in August of 2009.


Dialogue Starters:

Introduction

Roles of Community Members

Roles of Peers and Friends

Roles of Advocates

Roles of School Support Staff

Roles of Administrators

Roles of Postsecondary Personnel

Roles of Community Service Providers

Roles of Family Members

Roles of Students

Roles of Education Personnel

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Knowing your available time and your audience, choose one or many of the dialogue starters below.


Reaction Questions

1.    Why is transition planning important to you?  In human terms?  Relative to programs and services?  In building relationships?

2.    The statute and regulations focus on transition as a way to ensure successful post school outcomes for students with disabilities.  In your experience, how successful has this focus been to date?  

  • Please share examples of successes?
  • What are some of the gaps that have hindered success?


3.    This document speaks to the various roles/members of a transition team.  In your opinion, what/who are the essential roles/members who need to be a part of the decision-making team?  Why are they important to the process?

4.    Transition planning is about and for the student/young adult.  From your experience, please share examples of how students have been involved in their own planning process.  

5.    From your perspective, what are the pros and cons of having this provision regarding transition and post school outcomes in the law versus not having it in place?



Application Questions

1.    In order to ensure more successful post school outcomes for students with disabilities, what processes/procedures can we put into place to overcome the gaps we identified earlier?  

2.    What processes/practices can we put into place to overcome the possible difficulties among transition team members with differing agendas?

3.    What processes/procedures can we put into place to ensure implementation of the intent, as well as the letter of, the transition to post school outcomes provision of the law/regulations?


These questions were developed by the following
stakeholders working together within the IDEA Partnership:

Role:  State Education Agency
Location:  California

Role:  Youth
Location:  Michigan

Role:  Special Education Administrator
Location:  New Hampshire

Role:  Youth
Location:  Pennsylvania

Role:  Technical Assistance Provider
Location: Tennessee

Role:  Transition Coordinator
Location:  Wisconsin



The IDEA Partnership, located at the National Association of
State Directors of Special Education, is sponsored by the
U.S. Department of Education
Office of Special Education Programs.   2009

 

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Knowing your available time and your audience, choose one or many of the dialogue starters below.



Reaction Questions


1.    Providing equal access is a way in which the community supports the transition of youth from school to post school opportunities. 

  • What are some examples of equal access evident in your/this community?
  • What are some barriers you have seen/experienced?


2.    This document speaks to educating the community in disability awareness.  What is currently being done in your/this community to promote awareness?  

  • How is it happening?
  • Who is providing this disability awareness education?
  • In your opinion, how effective is the current community disability awareness education?  Please give some examples of effectiveness or lack of effectiveness.


3.    Are you aware of members of the community who have participated in an IEP team meeting? 

  • In an IEP team meeting for the purpose of transition?
  • In your opinion, when and under what circumstances is it appropriate for a member of the community to be invited to participate in a transition IEP team meeting?  Please give examples.



Application Questions

1.    In what ways can we engage the community to expand disability awareness?  To increase equal access?  To overcome the current barriers in our community?

2.    What processes/procedures can we establish to help the community recognize the benefits of employing persons with disabilities?  And, in preparation for such employment, become participating members of the community in building awareness and support for transition services?

3.    What processes/procedures can the schools put into place to identify and invite appropriate community members to an IEP team meeting, as needed?


These questions were developed by the following
stakeholders working together within the IDEA Partnership:

Role:  State Education Agency
Location:  Arizona

Role:  Family Member
Location:  California

Role:  General Education Administrator
Location:  North Dakota

Role:  Family Member
Location:  Tennessee

Role:  Family Member
Location:  New York
Role:  State Education Agency
Location:  Pennsylvania

Role:  State Education Agency
Location:  Pennsylvania

Role:  Youth
Location:  Wisconsin




The IDEA Partnership, located at the National Association of
State Directors of Special Education, is sponsored by the
U.S. Department of Education
Office of Special Education Programs.   2009
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Knowing your available time and your audience, choose one or many of the dialogue starters below.



Reaction Questions


1.    Currently, what disability awareness training/supports are provided to students and peers in your school building/district?

2.    Under what circumstances do you believe it is appropriate for a peer or friend to be invited to an IEP team meeting?  Please give some examples.

3.    In your opinion, what information would be important to be shared by a student’s peer in an IEP team meeting?  What knowledge and skills do peers and friends need to participate in a meeting?


Application Questions

1.    What processes and procedures can be put into place to increase awareness of disability/differing ability in our school/district?

2.    In order to support peers to understand the stages of relationship (peer, friend, confidant) and to participate appropriately in an IEP team meeting when invited, what training and experiences can we make available to both students with disabilities and their peers.


These questions were developed by the following
stakeholders working together within the IDEA Partnership:

Role:  Consultant
Location:  California

Role:  NASDSE
Location:  Virginia

Role:  Family Member
Location:  Delaware

Role:  Related Service Provider
Location:  North Carolina

Role:  Transition Coordinator
Location:  Virginia

Role:  Youth
Location:  New Hampshire




The IDEA Partnership, located at the National Association of
State Directors of Special Education, is sponsored by the
U.S. Department of Education
Office of Special Education Programs.   2009

 

dgheader.png






Knowing your available time and your audience, choose one or many of the dialogue starters below.




Reaction Questions


1.    What is your understanding of the role of an advocate before, during, an after an IEP team meeting?

2.    What knowledge and information do all stakeholders need to understand and embrace the role of an advocate?

3.    In your opinion, in what situations would it be most beneficial to involve an advocate?  And, whose responsibility would it be to invite an advocate into the process?  Please give some examples.

4.    Currently, how is information about advocacy organizations and persons shared in your district/state?  


Application Questions

1.    What processes/procedures can we put into place to share accurate and useful information about advocacy, advocacy organizations, and the role of an advocate?

2.    What practices can we put into place to ensure an IEP process

  • that validates multiple perspectives?
  • builds capacity within the IEP team so advocacy works?

 

These questions were developed by the following
stakeholders working together within the IDEA Partnership:

Role:  General Education Administrator
Location:  Arizona

Role:  Special Education Teacher
Location:  California

Role:  Youth
Location:  Delaware

Role:  Parent
Location:  North Carolina

Role:  Technical Assistance Provider
Location:  North Carolina

Role:  Technical Assistance Provider
Location:  Washington 




The IDEA Partnership, located at the National Association of
State Directors of Special Education, is sponsored by the
U.S. Department of Education
Office of Special Education Programs.   2009